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Travel with CPAP and oxygen


#1

I’ve been using PAP for 10+ years now. Recently (during a sleep study for a new machine) we found that my oxygen level drops into the 80s during sleep, so I was put on O2 to sleep.
I travel fairly often, and I am wondering what people use when they do- for the O2. I have a room air machine and a backup tank. Since I’m new to the whole O2 thing, I just can’t imagine having to lug something around. What do others do?


#2

I’m very interested in this topic. I, too, need oxygen at night and as far as I can see, it would requiring lugging the big machine in order to have the oxygen I need. I would never even consider going without it. We are planning a little weekend trip this next summer and right now I’m planning to lug the machine with me, along with my VPAP and hoses.


#3

This is a very good question!

Here is something I ran across in my own sweep of the web, it’s a pretty good overview of what it takes to travel with O2.

https://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/supplemental_oxygen/traveling_with_oxygen/

You definitely want to make sure you maintain your therapy because sleep apnea and hypoxia don’t take vacations, ever. :unamused: Plus, going without it might ruin your trip because of the poor sleep you will likely have as a result of skipping it.

A couple of things to think about, as well:

Altitude: Your needs for O2 may be different up in the mountains. If you’re heading to higher elevations, you may wish to talk to your sleep MD first to get any advice they have.

Airlines: A POC (portable oxygen concentrator) is considered Medical Equipment and you can carry it on your flight without giving up your two other carryons. You may wish to contact your airlines ahead of time to confirm any policies they might have regarding pre-registration of your equipment before you take your trip.

Local help: It’s never a bad idea to line up a local sleep clinic or respiratory equipment provider before you go on a trip in the event you have problems with your O2 while away from home. It can’t hurt to ask your own MD if they can make any recommendations or referrals; they might know someone in the area who could fit you in if there’s an urgent problem.

Hope this helps!


#4

I have recently traveled by train and my next trip by plane. Each time I contacted my O2 provider they provided a POC on wheels with batteries, AC/DC and car cords.

Have fun
Renee


#5

And if camping is your tonic…
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